Wall Tent Stove Pellet Conversion.

Broz

LRO Owner~Editor~Long Range Hunting Specilist
Joined
Apr 17, 2013
Messages
11,953
Reaction score
5,245
Points
113
Location
Foot of the Big Belt Mountains near Townsend MT.
Ok, so I did it and I am testing it as we speak. I had Rilet Stoves convert my Wrangle tent stove they built to a pellet burner.

She has been burning about 1 1/2 hrs. I will report more later, but all looks pretty darn good.

Easy to light. Testing done at 4100' asl. and started at 56* F.

First test is with "Lignetics" pellets from Rocky Mountain Supply.

20190822_082051_zps5pwzgfsw.jpg


20190822_082007_zpsybf3hl4o.jpg


20190822_082057_zpsh5le8lql.jpg

 
Last edited:

Broz

LRO Owner~Editor~Long Range Hunting Specilist
Joined
Apr 17, 2013
Messages
11,953
Reaction score
5,245
Points
113
Location
Foot of the Big Belt Mountains near Townsend MT.
Ignition was easy and quick with a propane torch in the ignition port. Started at 7:10 AM

Initial fill was with 22 1/2 lbs of pellets.

Throttle is set wide open to simulate worst case scenario for burn time.

Jeff
 

Broz

LRO Owner~Editor~Long Range Hunting Specilist
Joined
Apr 17, 2013
Messages
11,953
Reaction score
5,245
Points
113
Location
Foot of the Big Belt Mountains near Townsend MT.
2 hr observations:

No sparks out the stack, none and very little smoke.

Average temp on stove side surface of stove 12" forward of stack 450 to 550 degrees F

4 1/2" of pellets burned in 2 hrs, after rising to full heat and burning at full heat and max output. I will have a report of that in pounds later as I hope to get a pounds per hour figure.
 
Last edited:

Broz

LRO Owner~Editor~Long Range Hunting Specilist
Joined
Apr 17, 2013
Messages
11,953
Reaction score
5,245
Points
113
Location
Foot of the Big Belt Mountains near Townsend MT.
I got a good 4 1/2 hours of full heat (400* to 550* F) from the 22 1/2 lbs of pellets, and 15 to 20 minutes at both ends for heating up and cooling down. So one could say 4.5 lbs of pellets per hour of burn time with these Lignetics brand pellets.

So wide open that's 9 hours of heat from a 40 lb bag.

Here is what was left after the complete cool down. Seems some pellets either rolled away from the fire, or where possibly holding moisture and didn't burn well.
20190822_140838_zps7b9qtda1.jpg



This is what the grate looked like after today's test. Two swipes with a wire brush and she was clean.

20190822_140913_zpsujztaoyr.jpg
 

Broz

LRO Owner~Editor~Long Range Hunting Specilist
Joined
Apr 17, 2013
Messages
11,953
Reaction score
5,245
Points
113
Location
Foot of the Big Belt Mountains near Townsend MT.
I am anxious to try different pellets. Purcell brand claims "less than 1/2 the ash of "Premium" pellets standards." I believe less ash is important to keeping the grates clean. Purcel also claims " low moisture content equals much higher BTU output" I am anxious to see if that would result in all of them burning. Purcell claim to be all Doug fir and no additives. Fir should be harder than a pine fur mix.

More testing is in order for sure.

Jeff
 

CDE

New member
Joined
Jul 15, 2017
Messages
21
Reaction score
0
Points
1
Location
SW Idaho-McCall
I've used the Lognetics pellets and they seem to burn well. I've also used the Bear Mtn pellets. They burn very hot and seem to be very dense. not sure of the mix.
The un-burned pellets are normal in my stove. Keep the feed chute clean of any creosote. Pellets can stick to the creosote and block the feed causing some burn back into the feed chute.
Your going to love the constant heat these put out.
CDE,
 

Broz

LRO Owner~Editor~Long Range Hunting Specilist
Joined
Apr 17, 2013
Messages
11,953
Reaction score
5,245
Points
113
Location
Foot of the Big Belt Mountains near Townsend MT.
Is that another brand "Lognetics" or are we just spelling it different? I went and checked and mine say Lignetics.

Also I am considering building a plate to go inside the stove where the pellets fall to burn. Then add a 1/2 moon piece of strap to contain the pellets from rolling away from the burn area. I realize I will need to leave adequate room for feeding or I will cause a jam, but if I add a little handle it would make for easy lean out of the burn area and could be slid back to allow more room if needed.

I feel the roll away's that didn't burn could be just bad pellets, but more likely they got too far from the fire to burn.

Jeff
 

CDE

New member
Joined
Jul 15, 2017
Messages
21
Reaction score
0
Points
1
Location
SW Idaho-McCall
I'm sure they're the same brand.
I think the un-burned pellets roll out of the main burn area and have burned but not completely. I get several partially burned pellets that fall into the ash tray below the burn plate. I've made modifications over the years but mostly to air flow for better burning, so be careful when making changes.
 

Broz

LRO Owner~Editor~Long Range Hunting Specilist
Joined
Apr 17, 2013
Messages
11,953
Reaction score
5,245
Points
113
Location
Foot of the Big Belt Mountains near Townsend MT.
Thanks CDE, I was told by one person that he added a "T" to the top of his chimney stack and it increased draw. I was not sure how this can be, would you care to weigh in on this? And can you share any mode you have found to be worth my doing to my unit to reduce ash, build up on grate or increase draw or intake air?

Thanks
 

CDE

New member
Joined
Jul 15, 2017
Messages
21
Reaction score
0
Points
1
Location
SW Idaho-McCall
i would think that the tee or cap would only help in windy conditions. Pellet stoves work on blast gate technology where the fresh air is concentrated onto the pellet pile and grate. Hot air rises which helps create the draft. that's why pellet stoves don't work as well in high altitudes with the lower air pressure. I don't think this is as big of an issue with wood stoves though.
Any time that the ash or pellets restrict the air flow the burn is reduced. My stove has an ash tray below the burn grate. whenever the ash builds up and restricts the air flow i get the partially burned pellets. i would just make sure that the grate and area in front of the grate are clean of clinkers.
Have you asked Riley about the build up? what were their recommendations on installing above the bottom of the stove.
CDE
 

CDE

New member
Joined
Jul 15, 2017
Messages
21
Reaction score
0
Points
1
Location
SW Idaho-McCall
I forgot to mention that Lognetics (?) has been the lowest ash brand. Make sure that the pellets are kept dry inside the tent.
 

Broz

LRO Owner~Editor~Long Range Hunting Specilist
Joined
Apr 17, 2013
Messages
11,953
Reaction score
5,245
Points
113
Location
Foot of the Big Belt Mountains near Townsend MT.
Sounds good. Lignetics was the first I have found. Like dummy I took the top bag off the stack outside. Then at home noticed small holes in the bag. I will be more careful as I learn.

Still want to test the Purcell pellets too, and see that Lignetics offer a top shelf brand too. A little more testing, but I am pretty sure she will do fine if I clean the grate daily.

I also think I will fill the hopper with grate closed, then open slowly to reduce the rollers that got to far from the burn plate.
 

Broz

LRO Owner~Editor~Long Range Hunting Specilist
Joined
Apr 17, 2013
Messages
11,953
Reaction score
5,245
Points
113
Location
Foot of the Big Belt Mountains near Townsend MT.
8/27/19 Just started testing the Purcell Pellets. Loaded the hopper with 22.5 lbs to match the test with Lignetics.

Testing under way, result reports soon.

UpDate: Results with Purcell Pellets.

Lite time 12:15 with 22.5 lbs in hopper feed wide open.

Temp @ 12:45...... 350* F
Temp @ 1:45 ...... 465*
Temp @ 2:45 ...... 325*
Temp @ 3:45 ...... 425*
Checking at 30 min now due to low pellet level
Temp @ 4:15 ...... 260*
Temp @ 4:45 ...... 200*
Temp @ 5:15 ...... 175*

Not impressed with the Purecell Pellets. Never got as hot and average heat over 5 hrs was a lot lower than with the Lignetic Pellets.

I will let it burn out now and asses the amount of ash and clogging on burn grate.
 
Last edited:

Broz

LRO Owner~Editor~Long Range Hunting Specilist
Joined
Apr 17, 2013
Messages
11,953
Reaction score
5,245
Points
113
Location
Foot of the Big Belt Mountains near Townsend MT.
The Purcell Pellets are a no go for me. It appears to me they made a lot more ash and for sure clogged the burn grate a lot more. I suspect this greatly reduced the air flow through the burn chamber and was the reason for the stove running at much lower temps. Could be they also have a higher moisture content. But they are not a good choice for a gravity fed stove in my opinion.

20190827_195148_zpsntglatso.jpg
 

CDE

New member
Joined
Jul 15, 2017
Messages
21
Reaction score
0
Points
1
Location
SW Idaho-McCall
Add another length. It couldn't hurt. I use the double wall "B" vent pipe in 4" that is 6' in length above the stove and just above the ridge line of the wall tent. I think there's an old saying that the stove pipe needs to be above the ridge line for better venting. worth a try.
CDE,
 

Broz

LRO Owner~Editor~Long Range Hunting Specilist
Joined
Apr 17, 2013
Messages
11,953
Reaction score
5,245
Points
113
Location
Foot of the Big Belt Mountains near Townsend MT.
Add another length. It couldn't hurt. I use the double wall "B" vent pipe in 4" that is 6' in length above the stove and just above the ridge line of the wall tent. I think there's an old saying that the stove pipe needs to be above the ridge line for better venting. worth a try.
CDE,

I am close to 8' above the stove now, but easy to test another 2'
 

Broz

LRO Owner~Editor~Long Range Hunting Specilist
Joined
Apr 17, 2013
Messages
11,953
Reaction score
5,245
Points
113
Location
Foot of the Big Belt Mountains near Townsend MT.
I just spent 8 days and 7 nights off grid in the mountains archery hunting. I used the pellet stove with Lignetics pellets every night. I learned a lot. Give me a few days to get my life back in order and I will update with a detailed report here.

Jeff
 

Broz

LRO Owner~Editor~Long Range Hunting Specilist
Joined
Apr 17, 2013
Messages
11,953
Reaction score
5,245
Points
113
Location
Foot of the Big Belt Mountains near Townsend MT.
Ok so here is my assessment after spending 7 consecutive nights with the Pellet stove conversion. First, the amount of heat that can be generated is well above my expectations. It can easily turn the first 12" of the chimney stack red. A 40 lb bag of pellets will last 10 hrs on full throttle and often longer as the burn / draft grate becomes restricted with ash reducing draft. Un-burnt pellets or clinkers will also pile in front of the burn grate in the burn chamber and restrict air flow causing heat output to diminish. Other issues include the lack of regulation of heat output. You can reduce the area where the pellets flow, but reduce it too far and you have bridging issues causing the fire to diminish or go out. I also noticed that even when the flow of pellets are restricted, the heat output is huge and we almost always had tent windows open. This would be less of a problem in colder weather, but still is an issue for fall hunts and highlights the issue of heat regulation. I tried both restriction of the air intake and a damper in the stack. Both yielded similar results. They do slow the burn rate, but an adjustment may take an hour to level out and most always ends up with burn rate down to nothing or the flame goes out completely after a few hours.

It seems these are only good if you want a full raging fire, and are fine with cleaning the grate every 6 hours at a minimum. It will burn longer with a restricted grate, but output slows till it is down to nothing.

I went this route so I could go to bed and sleep all night without having to get up and add wood to a fire. Well, I didn't have to add wood, but I was up every single night at least 3 times rattling grates, clearing burn box area, or trying to regulate heat one way or the other.

Bottom line, I am still in search of a better heating source and I will likely convert this stove back to a wood burner until I try the "Next Best Thing"

Jeff
 
Last edited:

Tmmdcampbell

Member
Joined
May 7, 2017
Messages
168
Reaction score
4
Points
18
Has anyone ever tried coal? My understanding is it is twice as dense as wood and burns the same rate per pound. It doesn’t need to be seasoned and it burns wet. Only downside is the smoke doesn’t smell as good as a wood fire.
 

Nevada Smith

Well-known member
Joined
Sep 11, 2019
Messages
434
Reaction score
300
Points
63
Location
Northern Nevada
Has anyone ever tried coal? My understanding is it is twice as dense as wood and burns the same rate per pound. It doesn


Hmm, "Edit Post" doesn't seem to be correctly working...

Anyway -- I was wondering: Or coke? (The stuff blacksmiths use.)
 

Broz

LRO Owner~Editor~Long Range Hunting Specilist
Joined
Apr 17, 2013
Messages
11,953
Reaction score
5,245
Points
113
Location
Foot of the Big Belt Mountains near Townsend MT.
I have never considered coal or coke. Not even sure where I could get it, but I am sure it is available somewhere. The smell of coal would be an issue for me. I like the wood over it and the wood small ads a natural cover scent. With all the wild fires here in MT. I feel the animals are use to burnt wood smell.
 

Nevada Smith

Well-known member
Joined
Sep 11, 2019
Messages
434
Reaction score
300
Points
63
Location
Northern Nevada
From Wikipedia:

"Since smoke-producing constituents are driven off during the coking of coal, coke forms a desirable fuel for stoves and furnaces in which conditions are not suitable for the complete burning of bituminous coal itself. Coke may be combusted producing little or no smoke, while bituminous coal would produce much smoke. Coke was widely used as a substitute for coal in domestic heating following the creation of smokeless zones in the United Kingdom."

N.B. It may burn too hot for some stoves.

P.S. BTU is about 13,000 per pound (depends upon supplier)

 
Last edited:

Forum Sponsors

Top