Stock Bedding, By Ryan Furman

RBanta66

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Just watched your bedding video and with only minor difference and I mean minor looks like the bedding jobs I've done on a few rifles. I have in the past done the recoil lug first then test fired the rifle for accuracy, if it was good I then stopped if not I would bed the whole action as you did. Awesome video with great attention to detail where it matters most. It's almost comical cause as DIY types we do things very similar with very minor differences but as usual I did learn a couple new things.

Your video also showed myself I've been doing things !!👍👍
 

DEW

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Great Video. Couple questions. Do you put the electrical tape only on the bottom of the recoil lug? Piece that you pulled looked bigger than that. Also how tight do you get the action screws? I know you don’t want them torqued but do you want them fairly tight, just snug or ?
 

FURMAN

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Great Video. Couple questions. Do you put the electrical tape only on the bottom of the recoil lug? Piece that you pulled looked bigger than that. Also how tight do you get the action screws? I know you don’t want them torqued but do you want them fairly tight, just snug or ?
I only put tape on the bottom and sides of the lug. Not the front or back. I tighten the screws enough to know I am touching the mounting pad(are where a pillar would be) or the pillars and no more.
 
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ShtrRdy

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Thanks for putting this together Ryan! One question I had was is there any downside to taping off the outside of the stock?
 

DerekS

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Is the stock you are bedding carbon fiber? If so, looks like you treat carbon fiber like any other synthetic (i.e. fiberglass)? I'm pretty new to carbon fiber, and always feel like it will unravel on me.
 

FURMAN

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Is the stock you are bedding carbon fiber? If so, looks like you treat carbon fiber like any other synthetic (i.e. fiberglass)? I'm pretty new to carbon fiber, and always feel like it will unravel on me.
It is carbon and you treat it the same either way.
 

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Great video, picked up a couple of great tips. I was curious what stock that is, really like the looks. Thanks
 

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What’s your method for checking deflection prior to and after bedding? Are you using a DTI to check and ensure you truly have a stress free bedding job?
 

FURMAN

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What’s your method for checking deflection prior to and after bedding? Are you using a DTI to check and ensure you truly have a stress free bedding job?
Rifle accuracy and repeatability. Targets don’t lie.
 

FURMAN

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Neither does a DTI, and you never even have to leave the house.
Sounds like that’s your way. Great! So you get your rifle bedded, check barrel deflection, and then it sits in the gun safe?
 

FURMAN

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What are your initial thoughts and impressions on the stock? Is a review in the future?


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A review is in the near future. It is a good stock. I feel there are 4-5 better. I have reviews on all the others.
 

FURMAN

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I would venture to guess some of my bedding jobs would not pass the deflection test that many well known smiths would require at the same time those rifles shot very small groups at long ranges and were consistent in point of impact. I do feel if you are selling someone a service you need QC before it leaves the shop and deflection is easy for a smith to check. For me the only cut my rifles have to make is accuracy and repeatability. I can assure you if it had .003 deflection after I bedded my own rifle I would not be dremeling the bedding out and starting over. Take what you want from the video leave what you don't want.
 

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Sounds like that’s your way. Great! So you get your rifle bedded, check barrel deflection, and then it sits in the gun safe?
Yes I check bbl deflection, no my guns don’t sit in the safe. It’s a great way to eliminate one variable of accuracy. I definitely wasn’t bagging on your method, it seems to work well for you. There was nothing mentioned in your video on how you ensure a stress free job so I thought I’d ask what your method was. You can most definitely get away with some deflection in a stock and have it shoot good but to get the most accuracy and repeatability out of your rifle, why not take the time to make sure you’re bedding job is as good as possible? You’re already there doing the work so it makes absolutely no sense to not check it prior to bedding and after in my opinion. I’ve had plenty of stocks that came w factory installed pillars that were not set correctly and required tweaking to get the action sitting on them stress free. I’ve not checked them before and checked after and ended up tearing out a bedding job and rebedding. It’s not fun.

Just reading your latest post and I will 100% agree with you that I wouldn’t tear bedding out for .003” deflection in one of my stocks because I’ve tested that and they will shoot just fine. However, I’d most definitely tear it out and re do it for someone that was paying me for a bedding job.

As far as your video is concerned, it’s great, there are very few videos out there that explain the process because it is such a controversial topic.
 

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Great video. Do you use this same process for stocks that have an aluminum bedding block?

I've heard it both ways, typically I've heard people say go shoot it. If it shoots fine, leave it. Or maybe just bed the recoil lug. I believe Gunwerks still recommends bedding of their stocks where McMillan says they don't see the need. I don't have a McMillan (yet) but I believe they don't have a bedding block. But the Clymr that I have has an aluminum bedding block. So I'm just curious how you, and everyone, make the decision on which stocks to actually bed.
 

FURMAN

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Great video. Do you use this same process for stocks that have an aluminum bedding block?

I've heard it both ways, typically I've heard people say go shoot it. If it shoots fine, leave it. Or maybe just bed the recoil lug. I believe Gunwerks still recommends bedding of their stocks where McMillan says they don't see the need. I don't have a McMillan (yet) but I believe they don't have a bedding block. But the Clymr that I have has an aluminum bedding block. So I'm just curious how you, and everyone, make the decision on which stocks to actually bed.
I try to avoid aluminum bedding blocks other than Gunwerks but I did not bed my Magnus with the Terminus action and won’t bed a Gunwerks action sitting in their stocks.
 

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Ryan. Have you ever tried One Shot for a release agent?
 

FURMAN

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Ryan. Have you ever tried One Shot for a release agent?
No I have been using shoe polish since my second or third job. You can not even see it on the action so you know it is very thin and the application is consistent. I see no reason to use anything else.
 
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Ladd

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Ryan. Have you ever tried One Shot for a release agent?
I have. I didn’t like it. It didn’t release in a few places making for a difficult extraction. I won’t use it again.
 
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elkguide

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My ONE experience with One Shot ended with me being glad that I had a heat gun to warm up the action to get it to release.
 
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DEW

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Hey Ryan. I’m bedding a tikka action into a stock. It has that funky recoil lug. Would you just bed the lUgh into the stock permanently or not?
 

FURMAN

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Hey Ryan. I’m bedding a tikka action into a stock. It has that funky recoil lug. Would you just bed the lUgh into the stock permanently or not?
I super glue the lug to the action with no release agent anywhere on the lug, then bed as normal. The lug will stay in the stock when done. Some of the good aftermarket stocks have the lug in the stock already.
 

DEW

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Thank you. One last question before I dive in. Will Johnson’s wax work for a release agent?
 

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Have a few Manners on their way. What's everyone's preference on when you have to bed the pillars as well? I believe some people do it all in one shot or in two phases. In the past I have done it in two steps. Get the pillars epoxied in, then actually bed the action to the stock. I've done maybe a dozen bedding jobs, it still makes me nervous and have always just felt a little more comfortable with the two phases.
 

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Have a few Manners on their way. What's everyone's preference on when you have to bed the pillars as well? I believe some people do it all in one shot or in two phases. In the past I have done it in two steps. Get the pillars epoxied in, then actually bed the action to the stock. I've done maybe a dozen bedding jobs, it still makes me nervous and have always just felt a little more comfortable with the two phases.
When I do pillars I do it in 2 steps as well.
 

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In my bedding projects, spray on agents will puddle and the johnsons liquid was too thick; it doesn't really puddle but it leaves flow marks. The paste wax, when buffed, leaves no marks in the bedding epoxy
 

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Best release agent I ever used is the wax ring for toilets. Was out of kiwi, tried what I had. Wow released like butter. No marks in the bedding. Still using that same ring, probably got about 80 rifles left in the ring before I need more
 

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Best release agent I ever used is the wax ring for toilets. Was out of kiwi, tried what I had. Wow released like butter. No marks in the bedding. Still using that same ring, probably got about 80 rifles left in the ring before I need more
Used or new ring? Lol
 

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