Lets Talk Pellet Tent Stoves

Broz

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Looking hard at buying a pellet tent stove for this fall for my 12 x 17 wall tent. I would love to hear what you have or have used and its performance.

Tent size?

How long will a hopper last on a cold night?

Ease of use?

Efficient?


TIA
Jeff

 

M5dx

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We barrowed one last fall for a try in our tent. We weren't able to get it to draw unless we used a tourch to heat it up. If your chimney opening is in the roof it should be fine, ours is in the wall and it just would not get hot enough to draw and keep filling the tent with smoke. The friend we borrowed it from swears by it and said it would hold a fire all night.

Mike
 

Broz

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I'm in the same boat as you, but my plan is to retrofit my 4 dog stove that we use in our 14x16 wall tent. This is what I plan to try Pellet Burner Kit . I believe you still retain the option to use your stove as a wood burner.


Richard

I was just at Riley stoves and they can do this so my Riley Wrangler for $300. But I was not sold after finding out it could burn a bag a night, and the grate needs pulled and cleaned every two days.

I just want to go to bed and not have to baby sit a stove every 3 hours.

Jeff
 

Chippewa

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I'm planning my first elk hunt and really wondering why I don't see propane heaters used more for wall tents. The tent we are going to use doesn't have a chimney liner. Venting the propane worries me. Thinking the buddy heater puts out alot of CO and moisture.
 

hntnnut

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I'm planning my first elk hunt and really wondering why I don't see propane heaters used more for wall tents. The tent we are going to use doesn't have a chimney liner. Venting the propane worries me. Thinking the buddy heater puts out alot of CO and moisture.
Biggest issue we don't use propane any more except under certian conditions is the moisture they put out.
Jeff, with good wood we can get most of a night with out getting up. Our problem is trying to find good wood thats not rotten. Where we hunt northwest of Cody most of the wood is blowdown from the Yellowstone fires. And its getting old wasting time looking for burnable wood when we could be hunting.

Richard
 

Broz

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Biggest issue we don't use propane any more except under certian conditions is the moisture they put out.
Jeff, with good wood we can get most of a night with out getting up. Our problem is trying to find good wood thats not rotten. Where we hunt northwest of Cody most of the wood is blowdown from the Yellowstone fires. And its getting old wasting time looking for burnable wood when we could be hunting.

Richard

I have two stoves, a Riley Wrangler and a 35 gal barrel stove I built with a kit. I have a damper in the pipe too. All we have for wood is pine and fir. Fir burns longer but neither will keep ya warm more than 4 hrs tops. Typically we can drive to camp, so the pellets seem logical. Hard to pick the best option till ya try them I guess.

Jeff
 

Papa Charlie

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Was curious about this and did some reading, no personal experience. Most of the pellet feeders (Stove or Add On), burned about 40 pounds in 12 hours. that is questionable depending on temperature. Second, most required cleaning of the grate as much as every 2 hours. That alone would make these undesirable.
Going by the free standing stove my dad had in his house, you could stoke that unit up just before bed with wood and it would burn all night (low flame) and radiate heat enough to keep the house warm.
Now I know that stove was heavy and lined with bricks but one would think you could get similar performance from a tent stove. Watching the series Mountain Men, I have seen them use tent stoves in some extreme weather (Marty the trapper comes to mind) to keep warm in a pretty thin walled tent in Alaska in mid winter. Maybe he had to stoke throughout the night, they don't show that.
Anyway, sorry, not really contributing here. Just thinking out loud that there should be efficient enough stoves to burn regular wood that would last a night. Maybe stoke once. The pellet stoves sound like a PIA.

P.S. You posted while I was typing. Didn't think about the kind of wood that might be available.

Most articles said the Guide Gear stove was the most efficient.

https://www.amazon.com/Guide-Gear-O...ve-20&linkId=3437c2fb50443bd9d5e4976b82f7298d
 
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Broz

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We heat our home (8yrs old) with wood even with Montana nights at 30 below plus wind chill. My wood stove keeps us toasty and will burn all night (10 hrs) Go to bed at 72 degrees and wake to 68 with plenty of coals to just toss more wood in. Insulation is a wonderful thing. Get a good bed of coals, stoke it, choke it down and sleep warm.

The differences are, as stated good insulation, the ability to choke it down more, and the size of the burn box that allows more wood.

A wall tent is a different animal, burn rates are somewhat higher as heat escapes so rapidly. The needs are a consistent and reasonably hot burn. Bigger hoppers may be the answer to pellets.

Jeff
 

Papa Charlie

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You have a good point. We live on board our boat year round. A little more insulated than a tent but not a house. Trying to keep warm when it is in the teens or single digit is very hard even with our diesel heater and the electric heaters.
I use to snow camp when I was considerably younger and cold didn't bother me as much as it dose these days. We would just use our sleeping bags to keep warm.

I have always wondered about wall tents and keeping them warm. I can see where it would be a constant stoking. A couple of the add on units I cam across in my search would hold a complete bag of 40lbs.
 

M5dx

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After we bought -32 bags from Sportsman Warehouse our fire stoking job was over. Those bags run arounf $100, best wall tent bag ever.
 

MTNBOYJD

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Spent many nights in a wall tent. Never tried a pellet stove. A small airtight did the best. When I was about 12 my Dad took his 1973 pickup hunting, it had an 80 gallon propane tank in it. They hooked it up to a propane furnace in the wall tent, we stayed warm at -24 deg. Any wood fired stove causes sleepless nights in a tent. I like my 1966 camper with a Hydro Flame heater.
 

Chippewa

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Reflective surfaces are great heat barriers. Maybe stretching cheap safety blankets across ceiling or better get rolls of that shiny bubble wrap for around a water heater tank.
I'm still considering a propane heater of sorts but maybe vented style plus run a instant water heater with pump.
 

BillR

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I have spent a week in my wall tent at -30 degrees without any trouble. My stove was built for my by a local welder. Its 14X14X24 has a door with a angle iron lip that fits inside of the door opening which has 1" angle iron welded completely around the inside lip to help seal it. In the front of the door is a sliding vent. Inside it has a baffle built so that flame does not go straight up the chimney. on the front and back it has a handle welded to the top for carrying it. The whole in the top fits a 8" pipe and is in the back of the stove to enable the front to be used for cooking on it. On one side is a strap front to back along the top so that I can put the matching water tank that I had made that holds about 3 gallons of water which the stove heats up and the tank has a spigot on it. All my chimney pipe is cut to length and has a seam that comes apart along the length so I can fit it into the inside of the stove for travel. It weighs about 50 Lbs all put together and transferable from the back of the pickup to the wall tent but I sure wouldn't tray to pack it far. During that week long muzzleloading hunt it was so cold that the local newspaper came out and took pictures of us because they thought we were nuts. The game commission even sent out a game warden to see if we had froze to death. He came out the first day and when he scratched at the tent and asked if everyone was ok we invited him in for coffee. Totally shocked him how comfortable we were. After that when he showed up he brought rolls. Shot one of the biggest bucks I had ever shot that week and all three of us on the hunt missed one at least twice as big that we still talk about when we get together. That was a huge 7X7 Mule deer. I had a standing shot at 100 yds and was concentrating on the shot so hard I did not see the 5" tree between me and him and I drilled that tree dead center. Loved that stove and so did everyone else that stayed in the tent when it was cold out. Ended up donating it to the local muzzleloading club when I moved for another job.
If I was burning pine in it I would have to get up and reload it about 3 AM if we went to bed at 9:00 PM but that seemed to be no problem. Only real problem we had that whole week was one time I rolled over against the side of the tent and my breath froze my sleeping bag to the side of the tent and when I went to get up out of my cot in the morning I had a hell of a time getting out of the bag.
 

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I made use of an old earth stove by removing all the bricks from the inside and cutting away any excess metal from the outside of the stove. The stove has an adjustable vent that lets air in at the bottom rear of the fire box but I added a sliding vent in the door mostly so I could tell from bed how the stove is burning. I also welded a piece of sheet metal under the bottom to keep the direct heat off the floor...with no bricks it can get plenty hot. The warming tray was made from a piece of scrap being thrown away at my work and is quite useful. The water tank I welded out of stainless steel to fit the stove...got a little carried away here since it holds 9 gallons but comes in handy at bath time. The stove is not really that heavy with all the bricks etc. removed. We just throw it in the truck or trailer last with two people. We are fortunate where we hunt to have dead standing western larch trees that were killed in a fire and have no trouble keeping warm in a 20 X 15 tent all night on one loading in temperatures as low as 0 degrees. It would be much more difficult if we had to use wet wood off the ground. We always tarp our tent with one that is a couple feet wider than the tent which helps keep the heat in and the wind out.

View attachment 3753 View attachment 3754 View attachment 3755 Elk hunt 2012 003.jpg
 

BillR

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Love that awning on your tent. Always wanted to buy another wall tent with the awning but life got too busy and just didn't have the time to go long enough to need it. Can't stop the wanting though. Now that I have the time I don't have the energy LOL. NE first ML season.jpg
 

CDE

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You might check out Clarry Pellet stoves. I built a similar pellet stove. In comparison our wood stove only keeps a fire 3-4 hours. The pellet stove will run 10-12 hours on 40#'s of pellets. Better quality pellets burn cleaner and produce more heat. I clean the burn plate and ash drawer in the evening before re-igniting. I start mine with the old style gel.
The down side is you can only burn pellets. The Riley add-on allows you to burn both. Pellet stoves can be hard to draft at high elevation. It's hard to cook on a pellet stove like the Clarry. The steel above the burn plate on mine was 800-900 degrees with one of the laser temp testers. You can hear the cold water in the coffee pot sear when set in that area.
Personally I love the pellet stove. We do all our cooking on propane anymore. I almost bought the Riley. I think the add-on could be a great addition.
CDE,
 

anwahs

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Love that awning on your tent. Always wanted to buy another wall tent with the awning but life got too busy and just didn't have the time to go long enough to need it. Can't stop the wanting though. Now that I have the time I don't have the energy LOL. View attachment 3776

The awning, or porch as we call it, is just part of the tarp that covers the whole tent. I made the frame to match the tent and attach the tarp to the front with zip ties. The sides are smaller tarps that are also zip tied on. Very fast and easy to do. The added benefit is the extra width of the big tarp keeps the snow away from the edges of the tent and also helps the wind roll over easier. Elk spike 2018 077.jpg IMG_0850.jpg
 

jackalope

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For a floor I use an inexpensive poly tarp staked out tight that is just a bit smaller than the tent (14x16), it's easy to sweep clean and with a few throw rugs warm and comfortable. I have a door on each end of my tent as well and it's an excellent feature. I spend plenty of nights in the bivy and like base camp to be warm dry and comfortable, the photo shows the tank and heater of the shower system out the back door and the pellet stove. I can carry three weeks of all night warm fuel behind the seats in an x-cab nissan pickup.
To keep it burning all night you have to keep it turned up enough that unless it's fairly cold it keeps the tent pretty warm 75-80 so if I set it to run all night I often leave a door open. If I turn it down to keep things around 55 or so it will often go a bit dormant around 2am, it only takes a minute to get her going again which I do when I answer the call around then.

I'm in the same boat as you, but my plan is to retrofit my 4 dog stove that we use in our 14x16 wall tent. This is what I plan to try Pellet Burner Kit. I believe you still retain the option to use your stove as a wood burner.


Richard

Well, guess I'll be waiting for your feedback on this.

As for propane, as it has been already said - moisture.
Also propane heaters make me nervous because of the carbon monoxide. But in general, ventilation is highly important. When I first started to figure out about living in a wall tent I bought a smoke/co2 sensor.
 

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I have the pellet burner kit on my outfitter cylinder stove, works fantastic at lower elevations, our camp in ID is right at 8k ASL. Definetly did not work as well.
I was using softwood pellets both time i tried, a most awesome unit when they work correctly. I used a little less than a bag a day.
 

Broz

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I have the pellet burner kit on my outfitter cylinder stove, works fantastic at lower elevations, our camp in ID is right at 8k ASL. Definetly did not work as well.
I was using softwood pellets both time i tried, a most awesome unit when they work correctly. I used a little less than a bag a day.

So you think she would be ok at 5000 asl and under with a good amount of pipe?
 

gspman

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pellet burner

So you think she would be ok at 5000 asl and under with a good amount of pipe?

Broz;
at 5k i think you should be fine.
Hopefully more chime in in regards to higher altitude.
 

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I know 1 benefit that has not been mentioned, the sound of the the flame has some sort of sleep enhancing effect..or at least it did me..lol
 

Broz

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I know 1 benefit that has not been mentioned, the sound of the the flame has some sort of sleep enhancing effect..or at least it did me..lol

Yeah, I think I will convert mine. If it doesn't work well, I can always go back to wood. I like the thought of the flame sound too.

Jeff
 

gspman

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pellet stove use

Yup , i have watched that
Broz, 1 recomendation would be to bring a wire brush with to clean the chute/slide after every tank full. Just a quick scrub to get the residue off...clean feed of pellets .. i have found that it helps a great deal with smooth operation
 

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Hey gspman, just curious if you can transition from logs into pellets? We typically burn logs while we’re awake but it would be nice to kick it over to pellets at bedtime.

Thanks.


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gspman

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No problem at all, when you switch over just make sure all the vents are closed, adjust the flue flipper valve in the pipe for the best flame sound (loudest-effiecient)...hope that make sense, but that has to be adjusted with all vents closed on the front of the stove. if not you can fill the tent with smoke


Hey gspman, just curious if you can transition from logs into pellets? We typically burn logs while we’re awake but it would be nice to kick it over to pellets at bedtime.

Thanks.


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gspman

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oh and of coarse slide the pellet feed all the way towards the back of the stove to shut off pellets. I myselft removed the pellet hopper so there was no possibility of the it catching fire due to heat buildup. That closes up the backend securely
 

gspman

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have a bucket near by to dump hopper into as well..lol
 

wyoelk

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Yea, that makes sense. I think pulling the hopper is a pretty good idea, then you wouldn’t have anything to worry about.

Thanks for the insight!


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gspman

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pellet burner use

Yea, that makes sense. I think pulling the hopper is a pretty good idea, then you wouldn’t have anything to worry about.

Thanks for the insight!


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no problm wyelk

pellet burner makes a damm good ignight for damp wood !
 

Bootleggreg

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Ok I solved all your problems with wood verses pellet. I got a hunting partner that has to get up several times a night to pee. He Stokes the fire and I sleep
 

jimbires

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I had good results with this cylinder stove PA090841.jpg PA090838.jpg pellet burner . it burns close to a hopper of pellets over night , on cold nights . some nights it burned nice all night , other nights I had to clean at it , to keep it burning well . they recommend soft wood pellets , I couldn't easily find them locally so I used hardwood pellets . the big problem I had was trying to run it slow on warmer nights . I couldn't slow it enough and keep it burning . a couple of the nights it was about -15* so I ran it hard enough the pellets kept flowing . kept the tent warm , and dried my clothes so I was happy .
 

Broz

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I had good results with this cylinder stove View attachment 4229 View attachment 4230 pellet burner . it burns close to a hopper of pellets over night , on cold nights . some nights it burned nice all night , other nights I had to clean at it , to keep it burning well . they recommend soft wood pellets , I couldn't easily find them locally so I used hardwood pellets . the big problem I had was trying to run it slow on warmer nights . I couldn't slow it enough and keep it burning . a couple of the nights it was about -15* so I ran it hard enough the pellets kept flowing . kept the tent warm , and dried my clothes so I was happy .

I had the same problems. It sucked for fall hunts where you had to slow the pellet flow down or open both ends of the tent. I was up screwing with the pellet stove more than I ever did adding wood to the wood stove. So..... with a broken heart and depressed, my search for a tent stove that will run 8 hrs continues.

Jeff
 

MontanaMarine

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Besides the woodburner, we have a Nu-Way 4000 vented propane stove.


Model 4000 - Nu-Way Stove

We've only tested it in the backyard in mild weather. One burner on low heats the 6-man tipi nicely and sips fuel. A 20 lb jug should last a few nights.


kgKx8t9.jpg


I don't know how it would do in a larger tent, might be a bit light in the ass for a large wall tent in real cold. If you run both burners fairly wide open, it should throw significant heat, but you would need a bigger jug. Might be worth investigating.
 

jimbires

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I think one big advantage to pellets for me is , I'm not out there looking for wood . where I put up the tent there wasn't enough wood laying around for a night , let alone a week . hauling the sacks out did fill up a chunk of the truck bed .

 

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