Hunting Rifle build chassis style ?

bigbulls

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I'm doing another custom build, the others are EH1 stocks, what are your guys thoughts on going with a chassis style for big game magnum hunting rifle pros and cons, and if you think chassis which ones. GO

 

bigbulls

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Thanks Ryan, I have a MPR coming in 6.5 creed to just play with after your great review, which at least will give me an idea of the feel of a chassis. to all Please elaborate on dislikes or likes when you have time, carrying it, cheek weld, to heavy, to lite, not balanced, to cold, ect.
 

FURMAN

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Thanks Ryan, I have a MPR coming in 6.5 creed to just play with after your great review, which at least will give me an idea of the feel of a chassis. to all Please elaborate on dislikes or likes when you have time, carrying it, cheek weld, to heavy, to lite, not balanced, to cold, ect.
Folding chassis would be great for long pack ins. I just can not get used to the user interface. I don't love the way they ride the rear bag and I don't love ar15 style grips. You may love it. Many do.
 

OSOK - Crash

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Folding chassis would be great for long pack ins. I just can not get used to the user interface. I don't love the way they ride the rear bag and I don't love ar15 style grips. You may love it. Many do.

Ryan, all these reasons you mention are the reasons my next rifle will NOT be a chassis. The main one, is the rear bag ride. Although I have been able to run it best on the Hunters Wedge bag.

I bought my MPR because I thought I wanted an all around rifle for hunting and if I wanted to get into PRS. This is my first and like most of us, we learn a lot of what we want and like after the first. I still like my MPR, and have taken half a dozen deer further than ever before. But a regular stock is in my future.

Haven’t went down the PRS route. Maybe in the future. But not while this component shortage, and me learning how to reload right now.
 

NorCal_In_AZ

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Each have their advantages but I do prefer stocks for hunting rifles. I do however have a KRG Bravo on my .308 that I have hunted with. It’s not the lightest option, but it’s not heavy either. The more traditional butt stock rides a bag well and the grip, while vertical isn’t a pistol grip. The for-end has good attachment points for rails and is square. Both features let’s you use a tripod easily, either direct mount or clamped.
 

OSU Fisher

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I’ve never been a chassis guy. I do like the idea, and think it would be handy at times. Especially and mainly the folder aspect. I did order and xlr element 4.0 folder during Black Friday. At 1k it was a good deal for what it is and figured if I don’t like it I can get majority of my $ back. I plan to use it on a new build I’m acquiring parts for. All my current customs are in AG’s, manners, and McMillan and don’t want to tear one of them apart. My main and biggest fear is how it rides a bag. Will have their light weight bag rider on the buttstock to hopefully help. It seems you either love them or hate them. My hopes are not high… but there was only one way to find out.
 

DerekS

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KRG Bravo will definitely give you the closest "stock" feel while being more modular. If you want to go higher end, I'd seriously look at the KRG X-Ray. I too am not a fan of AR-15 style grips on my bolt guns, so the chassis systems I'm interested in don't have them. I will be upgrading my Bravo to a McMillan something. I've pretty much decided McMillan is my favorite stock.
 

Jasent

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Love my chassis rifles. The ability to adjust them to my body is awesome. I’m built like an ogre and most stocks find me wanting. I like the xlr chassis’s myself.
Made a simple bag rider that helps a lot
 

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Lancetkenyon

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I, too, am not a fan of a chassis precision rifle option. All the issues Ryan mentioned hold true for me as well. Same with most "hook" style buttstocks. I like a nice sloped stock for riding a bag or any other type of rear rest.
 

matt_3479

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I have a decent little mixture of both but in general I do prefer the feel of a stock. While I run a krg whiskey 3 in my 22lr prs set up and love the whiskey 3 I feel more “at home” behind a stock. I currently run a whiskey 3, mpa comp and bravo. The bravo is a nice mixture between adjustability and customizable of a chassis but feel more like a stock when behind it.

I’ve hunted with both my whiskey 3 and mpa and while nice the main reason I won’t do a chassis on a hunting rifle is they get freezing!!!!
 

DerekS

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On the freezing note stated by matt_3479, the x-ray looks the same aesthetically and has most of the features as the whiskey 3; however, it is covered with polymer panels so not as cold in the winter or hot in the summer.
 

Spreedizzle

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I was at Short Action Customs in Ohio (awesome shop by the way) today dropping off my 28N for throating…..and Alan was showing off to me the MDT 26HNT chassis. I have to say, it is a pretty awesome setup…..and if I were ever in “sheep hunting shape”….I would consider this chassis for the weight, folding stock, and just run it off of a tripod with the ARCA mount.
 

bigbulls

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I was at Short Action Customs in Ohio (awesome shop by the way) today dropping off my 28N for throating…..and Alan was showing off to me the MDT 26HNT chassis. I have to say, it is a pretty awesome setup…..and if I were ever in “sheep hunting shape”….I would consider this chassis for the weight, folding stock, and just run it off of a tripod with the ARCA mount.
Dang that looks nice, MDT 26HNT chassis
 

chicoredneck

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I like the one chassis rifle I have. I shoot a lot of AR15 rifles, so the pistol grip and tube style stock I’m used to. As far as bag riding is concerned, I added rider to my stock. I also often use the tube itself to ride on which I like because it has no slope. I prefer not having a slope as I find the recoil rides more straight back.
 

Diverjeff

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Ryan, all these reasons you mention are the reasons my next rifle will NOT be a chassis. The main one, is the rear bag ride. Although I have been able to run it best on the Hunters Wedge bag.

I bought my MPR because I thought I wanted an all around rifle for hunting and if I wanted to get into PRS. This is my first and like most of us, we learn a lot of what we want and like after the first. I still like my MPR, and have taken half a dozen deer further than ever before. But a regular stock is in my future.

Haven’t went down the PRS route. Maybe in the future. But not while this component shortage, and me learning how to reload right now.
When I use the wedge bag with my CA 338LM MPR I just turn the bag over(slanted side down)and sock it a few times to level it out,then settle the butt in to form a groove(works great).Since I don't lug it around in the field(total wt. is about 15 lbs.)I also added a Longshot Precision Adjustable Bag Rider which gives me an extra 1 1/2" of up or down height just by turning the adjustment wheel with a finger,also works great when shooting prone or from a bench and not having to fiddle around with adjusting the bipod height and/or squeezing the rear bag.Adds a little weight and bulk to the butt but since I'm not hunting with it I don't mind since it really gives a steady POA hold.
 

OSOK - Crash

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When I use the wedge bag with my CA 338LM MPR I just turn the bag over(slanted side down)and sock it a few times to level it out,then settle the butt in to form a groove(works great).Since I don't lug it around in the field(total wt. is about 15 lbs.)I also added a Longshot Precision Adjustable Bag Rider which gives me an extra 1 1/2" of up or down height just by turning the adjustment wheel with a finger,also works great when shooting prone or from a bench and not having to fiddle around with adjusting the bipod height and/or squeezing the rear bag.Adds a little weight and bulk to the butt but since I'm not hunting with it I don't mind since it really gives a steady POA hold.
@Diverjeff I was turned on to a great video by a very active member here on LRO. The video is by Phillip Velayo. In this video he talks about "building a bridge" and not relying solely on the bag to hold up your rifle. I used these techniques over the summer while snapping in (dry firing) and also live fire. I believe it helped my shooting a lot. Something about the video clicked with me. You still use the bag. But I was relying on it more to hold the butt. I believe this is why I would have flyers high.

I still use my Hunters Wedge. But I think I use more how it should be used than what I was before?

 

Diverjeff

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Morning brother,

I watched that video last year but never got around to trying it yet.The guy definitely has a for real substantial pedigree as 10 years a Scout Sniper,shooting for Hornady,and being a lead instructor for Gunwerks.Thanks for posting it up,I'd forgotten about it. (y) With my being 265lbs. and a 52" chest I can't get real low on the gun,and being higher up/more on my elbows is much more comfortable to me.

Thanks bro,
Jeff
 

bigbulls

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Thanks for the video, good info, makes since especially in the field shooting prone, for some reason the animals are never in that perfect place for a text book prone shot where I hunt. Lol
 

matt_3479

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On the freezing note stated by matt_3479, the x-ray looks the same aesthetically and has most of the features as the whiskey 3; however, it is covered with polymer panels so not as cold in the winter or hot in the summer.

Good point, bravo and x-ray eliminate that issue. Was actually thinking of getting an X-ray to try. Love the bravo and whiskey 3.
 

Greyfox

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I have used both chassis and conventional stock designs for hunting. My decision to try a chassis for hunting was driven as a result of competing in PRS. Between the high volume shooting from practice and matches, combined with the myriad of targets, ranges and positions, in time you become fully acclimated to the ergonomics, flexibility of the design, and the ability to very quickly assess and execute shots under a wide variety of circumstances. Surely, not all, but quite a bit of this can be extrapolated to hunting conditions. I doubt that I would have thought about hunting with a chassis had I not taken up PRC competition, and could easily understand why many would not like or favor the chassis without the opportunity to actually uses one extensively. While initially, the chassis felt awkward compared to the convention stock, in time this lessens or can even reverse. As to shooting qualities, I have found there to be no functional difference in accuracy/consistency between a chassis and well bedded conventional stock. While the weight of available chassis’ was once an issue, newer chassis designs have weights pretty close to conventional stock designs. My personal favorite is the MPA Lite/Hybrid which runs about 2.5 pounds.

 

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