CAST IRON

MTNBOYJD

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Maybe someone can support my thinking. This skillet was my Mom's, I'm 56. My wife thinks you have to scrub it with soap. I do not allow soap to touch my skillet. It is perfectly seasoned. Fried some chicken tonight, not deer steak for some reason, wiped it out with a paper towel. She said it's not clean. I say, you put raw meat in any pan it's not clean. Take it to 165 degrees and all is well. IMG_20201222_180028830.jpg

 

rfurman24

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Maybe someone can support my thinking. This skillet was my Mom's, I'm 56. My wife thinks you have to scrub it with soap. I do not allow soap to touch my skillet. It is perfectly seasoned. Fried some chicken tonight, not deer steak for some reason, wiped it out with a paper towel. She said it's not clean. I say, you put raw meat in any pan it's not clean. Take it to 165 degrees and all is well. View attachment 6279
No soap!
 

Broz

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You clean them with the left over coffee and some grounds. Or the left over grounds and some water. Heat up for a while and boil if you want. Then dump and wipe with paper towels. The acid in the coffee does the cleaning but leaves the skillet seasoned and looking perfect. Try it! I read this in a very old woodsman's book. Been doing it every since.
 

NC_Surveyor

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I use just hot water and a nylon scrub brush, dry it then set it back on the stove a minute to warm it up then wipe it down with a paper towel and vegetable oil. Nothing sticks to it, might as well be teflon.
 
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D_Dubya

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Once you have a good seasoning on them they can handle a little soap if the need arises - but if it’s seasoned well the need seldom arises. We use cast iron daily and most of the time it just gets a quick rinse with hot water and a nylon brush, then back on the stove on low until dry, a quick shot of spray on canola oil and leave on low until next time we walk through the kitchen. Soap on rare occasions but seldom needed - doesn’t seem to effect it. Took longer to type this than to clean a skillet. Some of my skillets are nearly new, some are probably 60 or 70 years old.
 

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We use our cast iron skillet almost daily as well. I got a lot of tips off Cowboy Kent Rollins Youtube channel. He does NOT recommend using paper towels, as it leaves and sheads lint and you don't want that. He recommends using a bandana. I use one and store it in a zip lock bag. Use Simple Green and a good rinse to clean it.

Recommends running the sink water until very hot. Have the cast iron medium temp as well. Run the skillet under the hot water. Most items will rinse off. If not, use a wooden utensil to lightly swipe stubborn stuck items. I have a designated utensil just for cleaning. Then return the skillet to medium heat. You can wipe out any access water, or wait for the skillet to evaporate it off. Once the side walls of the skillet are hot to the touch, take the skillet off the heat and apply a light coat of oil. Wipe with bandana, and you are good to go.

Also recommended is to use avocado oil, or grape seed oil. These oils have a higher smoke point.


Check out his YouTube site. His site is nothing but cast iron cooking and care. Good stuff!



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elkguide

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Sacrilege!!!!!!!
Don't think of using soap!
"IF" and I say "IF" you get something stuck or burned onto a cast iron pan, you can use salt to help clean it. If you heat the pan slightly, that will also help remove anything that might have gotten stuck on it. There also make a stainless chain type scrubber you could acquire to clean it. Keep it well seasoned and a warm water with a scrubby will always keep your precious cooking utensil in top shape. If your pan seems to be a little bit dry, put some olive oil, or other good oil in it and place it in the oven on low heat for an hour or so and it will be good to go.
ENJOY. There is nothing like a good, old, cast iron frying pan!
 

J2shooter

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Maybe someone can support my thinking. This skillet was my Mom's, I'm 56. My wife thinks you have to scrub it with soap. I do not allow soap to touch my skillet. It is perfectly seasoned. Fried some chicken tonight, not deer steak for some reason, wiped it out with a paper towel. She said it's not clean. I say, you put raw meat in any pan it's not clean. Take it to 165 degrees and all is well. View attachment 6279
Yep, that's probably clean enough for cast iron. Scalding hot water a nylon scrub brush and the plastic scraper on the other side if my brush is usually enough. Dry and coat with a very light coat of oil.
Coffee grounds as Jeff suggested and coarse salt works great to bust up some heavier stuff.

Do you know what kind of skillet that is? Maybe a wagner , they're fantastic.
I found an old wagner at my mother's house (rest her sweet soul) that no one recognized. It may have been left in the house before we moved there in 1984. Anyway, it was crudded up so bad you couldn't see marks on the bottom.

A couple days worth of easy off oven cleaner and sitting down in a plastic contractor bag took it down to bare metal and I re seasoned it from scratch.

When I wiped the crud on the back and saw wagner ware for the first time I was pretty pumped. These vintage iron pans are so good.
 

Brendan

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Soap won't hurt a properly seasoned pan. That tradition comes from the days where soap was made with Lye. I have sheet pans that I can't get the seasoning off with a brillo pad, hot water and soap no matter how many times I scrub it.

With that said, don't need to use it if you don't have to. Just water is best, followed by something like a salt scrub or chain mail scrub. Follow by heating it dry, then another coat of oil
 
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Broz

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I don't re oil with the coffee method. I am telling you guys, you should give it a spin. As for paper towels and lint, you don't have to rub that hard. But I can see where a towel or something "could" be better. Just lightly dry and knock the coffee grounds out. Then she is pretty and ready for next use. There is a cast skillet on our cook top most all the time.
 

OSOK - Crash

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I don't re oil with the coffee method. I am telling you guys, you should give it a spin. As for paper towels and lint, you don't have to rub that hard. But I can see where a towel or something "could" be better. Just lightly dry and knock the coffee grounds out. Then she is pretty and ready for next use. There is a cast skillet on our cook top most all the time.
I am going to give this method a try.

So you just put in old coffee grounds with some water and heat up? Do you have to do any scrubbing or anything else to the skillet?

Do you ever have to reseason your skillet?

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Broz

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I am going to give this method a try.

So you just put in old coffee grounds with some water and heat up? Do you have to do any scrubbing or anything else to the skillet?

Do you ever have to reseason your skillet?

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When camping, it goes on top the wood stove where I have a flat plate to cook on. After cooking, I dump the left over coffee and grounds in and heat it up again for a bit. dump it and wipe it out. If you use a lot of grounds, you may need to rinse it once before wiping. Grease is removed by the coffee and grounds. But if there is something burnt or stuck to it, rubbing with the grounds removes it well.
 

ridgeline300

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Broz, tried the coffee grounds. Thanks for the recommendation. Works very well. Removes all the gunk and gets it shining
 

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Im going to try the coffee grounds method but we ONLY use cast iron. If it can be wiped out then yes, thats all we do and your correct after 165 your good. Considering I preheat the skillet every time to 300 there is no worry. If its dirty from gravy or something then I scrap it out and boil some water for a few minutes to break the gunk loose. Scrub it with a stainless scour pad, rinse, wipe with thin AVACODO oil(any oil works but the burn temp is 500 and wont set off smoke alarms), then put up a brand new looking pan.
James
 

Broz

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Im going to try the coffee grounds method but we ONLY use cast iron. If it can be wiped out then yes, thats all we do and your correct after 165 your good. Considering I preheat the skillet every time to 300 there is no worry. If its dirty from gravy or something then I scrap it out and boil some water for a few minutes to break the gunk loose. Scrub it with a stainless scour pad, rinse, wipe with thin AVACODO oil(any oil works but the burn temp is 500 and wont set off smoke alarms), then put up a brand new looking pan.
James

Try the coffee and grounds. Use their abrasiveness instead of a scouring pad and scraping. and you will not need to reseason the pan
 

OSOK - Crash

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Broz, so funny this thread has been used lately, because I just went on to tell you the coffee grounds and left over coffee is a HIT!

I've used this method over the last couple of weeks with many different cooked items, and it has passed my tests. You are spot on with the comment that you can use the grounds to break up harder stuck on gunk. Works like a charm. I will be using this method from now on.

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If your seasoned pan ever gets gunky, like feels tacky from the oil, you've used too much. Throw it in the oven at 450-500 for an hour and then reapply a light light coat of your preferred oil as the pan cools down.
 

Broz

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Broz, so funny this thread has been used lately, because I just went on to tell you the coffee grounds and left over coffee is a HIT!

I've used this method over the last couple of weeks with many different cooked items, and it has passed my tests. You are spot on with the comment that you can use the grounds to break up harder stuck on gunk. Works like a charm. I will be using this method from now on.

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It is a life saver when camped in the wall tent. Easy clean up daily. Glad it worked well for you too.
 

lefty7mmstw

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Broz, sorry I can't use the coffee method on my cast iron. My wife sucks her coffee down (doesn't leave any) and I don't drink coffee much.
You are all right though to limit how hard you hit cast iron to avoid beating up the seasoning. I've seen damage done from soaking to the point where it was pretty much cut the old seasoning off and re-season.
 

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