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  1. #1
    LRO Owner ~ Review Editor ~ Long Range Hunting Specialist Broz's Avatar
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    Prone Position and Form

    Here I did a little video on what I do to set up for a long range prone shot. I get asked this a lot, and I thought a video might be an easier way to show my procedure. Check it out then ask questions or comment here.

    http://www.longrangeonly.com/long-ra...tion-and-form/

    Thanks!

    Jeff

  2. #2
    Senior Member FEENIX's Avatar
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    Nicely done Jeff and thanks for sharing.

    Ed

  3. #3
    LRO Product Review Editor
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    I enjoyed the video as well.

  4. #4
    Quote Originally Posted by Broz View Post
    Here I did a little video on what I do to set up for a long range prone shot. I get asked this a lot, and I thought a video might be an easier way to show my procedure. Check it out then ask questions or comment here.

    http://www.longrangeonly.com/long-ra...tion-and-form/

    Thanks!

    Jeff
    Jeff: As always you put together lot of information. One pointed I didn't know was setting up just below the POA, going to add that to my check list.
    Again thanks for the info.

    Charlie

  5. #5
    This couldn't have come at a better time. I was out yesterday practicing prone. We normally have a bench we hunt with. I heard to zero your gun prone too which I did and in fact was off a couple clicks from the bench. I have decided to shoot/hunt prone only moving forward. It was uncomfortable for me. I always hear get the body directly behind the gun. I know it is hard to tell in your video but you seemed like you came into the rifle at more at angle and stayed that way more than I anticipated. The reason I mention this is it was more comfortable for me to come in under the gun from the side and then try and straighten my legs out some. In fact the most comfortable. Maybe I was trying to hard to be behind it and not take a more natural position. This is going to take some time for me, t wasn't very comfortable and felt neck strain etc. I noticed on a Holland video he also had the kid come from the side and then straighten out?
    What I really liked about your video is what you looked like after the shot, nothing moved. I need some work. Maybe I missed it, what is the reason to be directly under the target with scope, to then squeeze the bag up? I will say I saw my shots more than I ever have.
    THANK YOU FOR THIS.

  6. #6
    LRO Owner ~ Review Editor ~ Long Range Hunting Specialist Broz's Avatar
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    Bob, I always teach to get as straight as comfortably possible behind the rifle. What I had in the video that is hard to see was I was on a bit of a side hill. Enough that I ran the down hill leg of the pod 1 notch higher. If we get to far out of line with the rifle, recoil will push us left or right off the target. That makes spotting hits very hard. So if that starts to be an issue try to straighten up. I cant say enough about muscle memory here. That tight neck will loosen with use. At least we hope it does. The same with getting straighter with the rifle. The more we use, stretch and train these muscles the more they will loosen and comply. The point I want to make about starting with the reticle just below the aim point is, I want the last thing I do to the sand bag to be pushing the rifle stock down to make the bag tighter. If the last thing we do is squeeze the bag to bring the crosshairs down, we run the risk of the bag being too soft and it might collapse under recoil causing the shot to go high. I have seen this way to many times. A tight bag in the back is very important.

    Jeff

    Edit: I want to add, that how straight we can get will depend greatly on the terrain we are laying on. Sometimes it will just force us to move to where we can get solid. But we want to be as straight as possible.

  7. #7
    Senior Member
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    Nice video! Thanks for putting this together!

    Do you place the butt of the stock on your collar bone or below it?

    Do your crosshairs end up back on target after recoil, or slightly off?

  8. #8
    LRO Owner ~ Review Editor ~ Long Range Hunting Specialist Broz's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by ShtrRdy View Post
    Nice video! Thanks for putting this together!

    Do you place the butt of the stock on your collar bone or below it?

    Do your crosshairs end up back on target after recoil, or slightly off?
    I place the recoil pad on my shoulder muscle. Just outward of the collar bone.

    Edit to answer other Q: The crosshair rarely come right back to point of aim during recoil. But should be in the area of point of aim.

    Jeff

  9. #9
    Senior Member kbaerg's Avatar
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    Great video and lots of tips here. I will say from experience from listening to Broz, get yourself setup right the first time and keep it consistent. I struggled some ago from not being behind the gun properly, once I fixed my problem my shots were back on track and spotting my shots came easy as well .

  10. #10

    I have found there many variables to shooting prone. Shoulder and cheek pressure are very important as well as lining up behind as straight as possible. Too much cheek pressure will make shots go high. Too much shoulder pressure will also make shots go high. Improper scope leveling will move a shot left or right.

    I personally go through a mental check list before any long shot.

    1 - Lined up as straight as possible behind rifle
    2 - Scope level
    3 - rifle just touching shoulder
    4 - Cheek lightly pressed on stock
    5 - Not putting pressure on stock ( I have a tendency to put a thumb on the stock )

    If I can put all this together I normally make a good shot.

    Enjoyed the video!!
    Hope this helps.

    Randy

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