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  1. #1

    McMillan stock comment

    I saw the recent thread by Broz regarding buying a McMillan that is already painted or ready.
    I also saw the thread in the reviews regarding the McMillan Game Hunter and Game Warden stocks.

    The comments regarding not needing to be bedded as well as the fit are what prompted me to make this post.

    Recently my shooting partner/friend purchased a McMillan black-painted stock from inventory for a Weatherby Mark V. They ran a special, and he took advantage of it. In addition, he called the next day and had them add tan and gray speckles to the paint so he didn't end up with a plain black stock. It took an extra week to get it, but we didn't care.

    The stock is now here as I'm the one preparing it and assembling it. In checking out the fit I first thought that the added speckles might have added a bit too much material to the inside of the stock, as they paint almost everything when they paint a stock. As I fit it and sanded it to get it perfect, you can see in the photos below that it was more than the speckles and more than the black paint that made the action area too tight. I anticipate bedding it this weekend.

    I'm just letting everyone know that you need to be sure the barreled action fits properly and not assUme that it will fit perfectly. I have a molded McMillan here that fits one of my rifles almost perfectly, but I will bed that one too.

    FYI, the flat area behind the recoil lug is sanded just for adhesion of the bedding material. That fit fine; it was the sides that did not fit so well. Also, the rear action screw hole was crimped or bent on top (see the thin forward lip) and I had to fix this area too.
    Attached Images Attached Images

  2. #2
    LRO Owner ~ Review Editor ~ Long Range Hunting Specialist Broz's Avatar
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    Are you saying the rifle would not fit in the stock and needed inletting? Or that you prefer bedding?
    Did you contact McMillan with any of your "Concerns" ?
    I also wonder if they inlet differently for the numerous Mark V production actions?

    Jeff
    Last edited by Broz; 02-27-2019 at 20:38.

  3. #3
    LRO Owner ~ Review Editor ~ Long Range Hunting Specialist Broz's Avatar
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    This is posted in my review thread, but it needs to go here too I think.

    The McMillan website says:

    Q: Do you recommend Barrel Bedding or pressure points?
    A: No, after installing thousands of stocks we have observed that 98% of the rifles are most accurate when free floated.

    Q: Do I need to bed the receiver?
    A: We have found that in most cases our drop-in and custom fitted stocks provide better than adequate accuracy unbedded. However, the final determination is left up to the individual shooter. Bedding services are available from your local gunsmith. We no longer offer bedding services.

  4. #4
    The average thickness of one coat of paint is 2-3 mils or .002-.003. If a stock doesn’t fit an action, it’s not the paint.

  5. #5
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    I personally cant imagine building a custom rifle with everything machined to 0.0001 of an inch and plopping it in a high end stock without bedding. That seems extremely counter intuitive to me. There just isn't any way you can have as good, and stress free mating of the action to the stock as you can with a proper bedding job. But that's just me.

  6. #6
    LRO Owner ~ Review Editor ~ Long Range Hunting Specialist Broz's Avatar
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    I have been bedding most my rifles for years. I can appreciate the difference between the way and average custom stock fits, and the way a McMillan made for my rifle specs fit. I have also seen many rifles shoot well before bedding, and after a complete bedding job there was no notable gains.

    I think this is why McMillan makes this statement. "the final determination is left up to the individual shooter."

    Jeff

  7. #7
    LRO Owner ~ Review Editor ~ Long Range Hunting Specialist Broz's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by BClrh View Post
    I personally cant imagine building a custom rifle with everything machined to 0.0001 of an inch and plopping it in a high end stock without bedding. That seems extremely counter intuitive to me. There just isn't any way you can have as good, and stress free mating of the action to the stock as you can with a proper bedding job. But that's just me.
    Here is some "Food for thought" maybe? Yet there are a reasonable amount of competition shooters that do just this with a chassis. Why is it acceptable for one, and not the other?

    Just looking for conversation, not disagreeing.

    Jeff

  8. #8
    On the topic of bedding, I'll defer to this article we have on our website written by Kelly McMillan.

    Should You Bed Your New McMillan Stock? | McMillan Fiberglass Stocks

  9. #9
    LRO Owner ~ Review Editor ~ Long Range Hunting Specialist Broz's Avatar
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    I have a question. And again, I have been bedding my rifles for years in all stocks.

    Question: How many of us would agree, that when using a high end custom stock like McMillan, there are a pretty high percentage that are actually robbed of some accuracy from sub par bedding jobs?

    After bedding probably over 100 stocks in the past 30 yrs, I know things can go wrong, and there is more to it than smearing epoxy in. I tend to feel more are botched up DYI jobs than not.

    Jeff

  10. #10

    That's a good question, Broz.

    Fact of the matter is you really have three outcomes when bedding a stock.

    1. You gain some degree of measurable accuracy (I'm talking results on paper here)
    2. Your bedding job was sub par and you lost some degree of measurable accuracy
    3. You neither gain or loose accuracy, no change

    The only way to truly determine what result you achieved is to shoot the gun unbedded first. Then, if you feel you will achieve better accuracy by bedding, bed the gun. Shoot to confirm results.

    Many people just bed everything and really aren't able to tell if they are benefiting from the extra work or not. A McMillan stock doesn't have to be bedded to shoot well. It's just not a requirement.

    Essentially, shoot first, ask questions later.

    The reality, is that 75% of our stocks, don't ever get bedded. In a McMillan Stock specifically, the microscopic glass fibers from the machining process flex and bend under the action and is practically self bedding. Something that just doesn't happen in wood, plastic or aluminum. In the case of a painted stock the paint actually flattens out when you torque your action in and becomes a bedding surface of sorts. So whether you want to sand that out and change the bedding surface to epoxy, is up to you. whether you can measure the difference in accuracy, if there is one, is the question.

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