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  1. #1
    LRO Owner ~ Review Editor ~ Long Range Hunting Specialist Broz's Avatar
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    How to Bed a Scope Rail Base

    I did a little video on my process to bed a scope rail base.

    Go HERE to watch the video. Hope you find it useful.

    Thanks
    Jeff

  2. #2
    Thanks Jeff for a very informative How To Video. I am going to bed a rail soon and now I know the proper way to do it.
    So on another topic I could not help but notice the 1911 on your hip. that is another one of my weaknesses. Tell me about it? Here are 3 10MMs I have I built the top and bottom one.

    thumbnail_DSCN0201.jpg

  3. #3
    LRO Owner ~ Review Editor ~ Long Range Hunting Specialist Broz's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by sedancowboy View Post
    So on another topic I could not help but notice the 1911 on your hip. that is another one of my weaknesses. Tell me about it?
    Thanks, Yes I carry daily. That's a Kimber compact Covert II in 45 acp. I am a die hard 1911 fan and it took me a while to even try a compact, but I sure am glad I did.

  4. #4
    Great video Jeff, thanks for taking the time. I had a thought and was curious how you felt about it. When using a rail with a level built in do you feel confident that the rail is perfectly level and true with your receiver when simply torqued down? Reason I ask is because I've seen production rifles manufactured with scope base screw holes drilled and tapped out of square with the receiver. So, you could tighten down a scope rail and check square between the top surface of the rail (or use the level in the rail) and check the true receiver level off of the bolt raceway and actually get two different readings on the levels. After discovering this I started leveling the receiver off of the bolt raceway only. Maybe this isn't an issue with custom receivers, just curious if you've run into this as well.

  5. #5
    LRO Owner ~ Review Editor ~ Long Range Hunting Specialist Broz's Avatar
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    As long as the retical , and the turret travel are plumb to the bubble it should be good to go. I actually set the reticle off a plumb line to be true when the bubble says we are true. Same as we would with a scope tube mounted level. Then I make sure the turret travel follows this line with a tall target test. Top of the round barrel is always top even if the receiver is canted. There is a vertical line to consider between the two bores (barrel and scope) but I have had great success with my method. But as with many things, we can always dig as deep as we see a need to.

    Jeff

  6. #6
    Awesome video! You make it look so easy...and it probably is. I need to build up the courage and give this a try :-)

  7. #7
    Good video Jeff. I noticed the front of the receiver was low compared to the back, when I do them I only install the screws slightly on the low side for alignment and barely snug on the high side. Do you see a benefit going snug on all four?
    "Never argue with an idiot. They will bring you
    down to their level and beat you with experience."

  8. #8
    LRO Owner ~ Review Editor ~ Long Range Hunting Specialist Broz's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Franklin View Post
    Good video Jeff. I noticed the front of the receiver was low compared to the back, when I do them I only install the screws slightly on the low side for alignment and barely snug on the high side. Do you see a benefit going snug on all four?
    I try to keep all four in an effort to retain the moa of cant. I should probably not use the word snug, as it could mean different things to different people. What I try to do is just squeeze out the epoxy. Once the rail touches the action no more tightening is requires till epoxy sets.

    Jeff

  9. #9
    Hi Jeff, thank you for the video. I have a 20 MOA scope rail that has space between it and the receiver. I tried to bed it but eliminated all of the built in MOA plus some. What you feel would be the max gap before replacing the rail?
    Thanks,
    Steve

  10. #10
    LRO Owner ~ Review Editor ~ Long Range Hunting Specialist Broz's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Jackmonkey View Post
    Hi Jeff, thank you for the video. I have a 20 MOA scope rail that has space between it and the receiver. I tried to bed it but eliminated all of the built in MOA plus some. What you feel would be the max gap before replacing the rail?
    Thanks,
    Steve
    Hi Steve, that seems awfully extreme. May I ask what rail and what rifle? I had onr about like that once, it was an EGW rail on a short action Weatherby.

    Shims could be made , but I dont like that. So lets see if we can find why you have that big of a problem.

    Jeff

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