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Thread: Sight Location

  1. #1
    LRO Owner ~ Review Editor ~ Long Range Hunting Specialist Broz's Avatar
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    Sight Location

    Ok, I finally have my new Option Archery sight in hand. This sight is highly adjustable. One adjustment is the distance you can position it away from the riser. I have heard pros and cons to farther out and closer in. With hunting to 50 yards and target practice out to 120 yards, what is preferred, closer or farther out? Supporting data is always appreciated.

    Thanks
    Jeff

  2. #2
    Jeff I have no data to prove a thing. I prefer farther out. The reasoning is simple. Just like when shooting open sights on a rifle or hand gun. The longer the barrel the either to hold on the target without moving all over. Or so it seems that way to me. Not to mention the farther apart the sighting points are, the less variation there is in if you hold just a little different each time. In a perfect world that would not be a problem. Basically the farther apart the aiming points are the less the point of impact is change by slight variations in how you shoot.

    Thats my reason I like the sight farther away. But depending on the hunting application it might stick out and get hit easier.
    The memory's of the hunt and fresh meat on the table combined with the beauty of Gods creation. Keeps many a man from being a vegetarian. --- DLG

  3. #3
    LRO Owner ~ Review Editor ~ Long Range Hunting Specialist Broz's Avatar
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    Thanks for the reply! I did some digging today on line. The more I learn about archery, and compound bows, the more I feel they are a lot like LR rifles. What I found was the farther out the pins, the more movement you will see as your hold oscillates. So closer in offers "the feel" of less oscillation of the pins, but farther out offers a more precise hold..... if you can hold it. The other point of interest was the farther out the pins, the more space between them. IE, if your pins are on 20, 30, 40 yards, sights farther out will have more distance between pins. Since I want all the yardage I can get from my sight, I didn't want to go too far and give up yardage by running out of housing room. So, with my new Option 8 S sight in the middle position of the mounting notches, my pins are 12" from the relaxed string. I shot a few arrows tonight and I was doing ok for grouping (when the wind allowed it) so I am going to work from there unless I run in to other issues. My only concern at this point id my top pin all the way up is close to the housing top at 20 yards. I think I will get use to it, with time. I think this will be necessary to be able to dial to 110 yards with my floater pin.

    Thanks
    Jeff
    Last edited by Broz; 05-07-2018 at 18:50.

  4. #4
    Those are all very good point Jeff. My pines are set at exactly 13 inches from the relaxed string. That about where my 20 yard pin is to. Real close to the top. I am by no means a expert. Just enjoy shooting groups and trying for longer distances and still keep them on a deer sized target. or in the vitals. You know the bow I have. Its tricky.

    Feel free to post up what you find out as you test the new sight. I am interested to hear how it works for you and to see how you end up setting it up.
    Last edited by NEMTHunter; 05-07-2018 at 20:21.
    The memory's of the hunt and fresh meat on the table combined with the beauty of Gods creation. Keeps many a man from being a vegetarian. --- DLG

  5. #5
    LRO Owner ~ Review Editor ~ Long Range Hunting Specialist Broz's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by NEMTHunter View Post
    A quick question. How "busy" does the site feel with 8 pins?
    It is an "Option Archery Option 8S, but I ordered it with 3 fixed pins and one floater. This sight allows you to flip the set pins out of the way so all you have is the floater. Just a single pin that can be adjusted from 20 yards to 110. Or the way I hunt with it is I have the set pins on 20, 30 and 40, then dial the floater to 50 and leave it. If I need to go farther I can dial the floater out, but I pretty much have been limiting my hunting shots to 50<. If I improve I may sneak that out a bit in great conditions. So its pretty open with the large oval housing and 4 pins.

    Jeff

  6. #6
    Thanks Jeff. I looked the sight up. It seems to me it is a nice sight. I do like the floating pin that can be dialed. If you Practice at longer ranges and get good at them your normal hunting ranges should be a breeze.
    The memory's of the hunt and fresh meat on the table combined with the beauty of Gods creation. Keeps many a man from being a vegetarian. --- DLG

  7. #7
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    Quote Originally Posted by NEMTHunter View Post
    Thanks Jeff. I looked the sight up. It seems to me it is a nice sight. I do like the floating pin that can be dialed. If you Practice at longer ranges and get good at them your normal hunting ranges should be a breeze.
    Thats the plan, just like we do with rifles. Longer practice increase the size of errors and make changes that work easier to deal with.

    Yeah, the fact that only one pin moves for the floater is big with me. I prefer this over the entire housing with all pins moving.

    Jeff

  8. #8
    We should have talked about this!

    When you want more youtube time search "torque tuning".
    John Dudley has good videos explaining the reason and process. it's an in depth process.

    Along with torque tuning to decide the position of your sight and rest, I like to have the sight adjusted out away from the bow just far enough to create a halo effect of the peep around the white ring on the sight housing.

  9. #9
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    Quote Originally Posted by Tony Trietch View Post
    We should have talked about this!

    When you want more youtube time search "torque tuning".
    John Dudley has good videos explaining the reason and process. it's an in depth process.

    Along with torque tuning to decide the position of your sight and rest, I like to have the sight adjusted out away from the bow just far enough to create a halo effect of the peep around the white ring on the sight housing.
    I am close to that, but the new oval housing my leave some of the bottom of the white ring out,

    Jeff

  10. #10

    Jeff - search "Torque Tuning Tim Gillingham" and it gives some more info, but here are my notes on the process, I think copied from Jesse Broadwater? Had made a big difference on some bows, but my Hoyts always end up good with the sight dovetail all the way out and rest as far back as it'll go.

    Basically - intentionally torque bow, but still put pin on target, and see where the arrow hits.




    Torque Tuning

    It's really an act of finding a "sweet spot" distance between the arrow rest and the sight.

    When Intentionally Torquing the bow - If the arrow missed in the direction the stabilizer was pointed, you need to increase the spread of the sight/rest by sliding the rest back (hence the overdraw mounts being offered these days) or by extending the sight.

    If the arrow missed in the opposite direction the stabilizer was pointed, you need to decrease the spread by sliding the rest forward or the sight in.

    Repeat until all arrows hit together horizontally regardless of torque. (don't forget that your zero changes when you slide the sight around so what matters is getting them all hitting together and then re-zeroing).

    As a note, a small adjustment of the rest equates to a large adjustment of the sight for most shooters. Not everyone gets the same results, some guys are sliding the rests back or sights out on similar setups that other guys end up sliding the rests in or sights in. I like my sight to be within a reasonable range of "normal" so that I don't get big changes to lens clarity or peep size, etc.

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